Sludge Watch ==> The Drug Store in Your Tap Water

Maureen Reilly maureen.reilly at sympatico.ca
Wed Feb 2 19:48:11 EST 2011



 
 
 
http://www.theepochtimes.com/n2/content/view/50475/
The Drug Store in Your Tap Water
By Martha Rosenberg Created: Feb 2, 2011 Last Updated: Feb 2, 2011 
    |  |  
Related articles: Health > Environment & Health 
 
ST. LAWRENCE PHARMACY: Male fish in the estrogen-laden St. Lawrence River around Montreal are developing ovaries. (Olivier Jean/AFP/Getty Images) 
 
While pharma and water-treatment professionals routinely deny the existence of prescription drugs in public waterways and drinking water, Mary Buzby, director of environmental technology for pharma giant Merck, was a little more candid in 2007.You don't have to eat cattle that have worn trenbolone ear implants to end up with the growth-stimulating androgenic hormone in your body, reported the Associated Press in 2008. 
Water taken near a Nebraska feedlot had four times the trenbolone levels as other water samples, and male fathead minnows nearby had low testosterone levels and small heads.
Nor do you have to see a doctor to imbibe a witch’s brew of prescriptions like pain pills, antibiotics, and psychiatric, cholesterol, asthma, epilepsy, and heart meds in your drinking water, says the AP. And it’s all free of charge.
Other “biosolids” found in drinking water include antifungal drugs and bisphenol A, the toxic plastic found in some bottled waters, which people ironically drink to avoid tap water. 
Related Articles
Cholesterol Drugs and Antidepressants in Drinking Water? 
Drug Residues in Drinking Water 
 
“There's no doubt about it. Pharmaceuticals are being detected in the environment and there is genuine concern that these compounds, in the small concentrations that they’re at, could be causing impacts to human health or to aquatic organisms,” she remarked at a conference in 2007, says the AP.
And if we need a second opinion about the antibiotics found in Tucson drinking water, sex hormones in San Francisco drinking water, and seizure and anxiety meds in Southern California drinking water, there are the animals themselves.

 
(Martha Rosenberg) Fish caught near wastewater-treatment plants near five major U.S. cities had residues of drugs for treating cholesterol, high blood pressure, allergy, bipolar disorder, and depression, reported Discovery news in 2006. 
Male fish in the estrogen-saturated St. Lawrence River around Montreal are developing ovaries, reported Daniel Cyr, at Quebec’s National Institute for Science Research, according to the Independent Post in 2008.
And now fish in the same area are showing signs of the antidepressant Prozac in their systems, says the University of Montreal.
That’s not counting the feminized frogs with both female and male sex organs that are increasingly found in U.S. waterways and even suburban ponds, an ominous “canary in the coal mine” trend that indicates serious ecological damage, say scientists.
 
When scientists studied hybrid striped bass exposed to Prozac at Clemson University, they found the fish maintained a position on the surface of the water, sometimes with their dorsal fin out of the water, unlike the fish not on Prozac, which remained at the bottom of the tank. 
Staying near the top of the water and maintaining “a vertical position in the aquaria” could increase the bass’s susceptibility to predators and decrease their survival, reported the researchers. Nor did the bass eat as much as non-Prozac fish.
A similar loss in survival behaviors has been seen in shrimp exposed to Prozac. Such shrimp are five times more likely to swim toward light than away from it, making them also more susceptible to predators, reports the Southern Daily Echo News.
“Crustaceans are crucial to the food chain, and if shrimp’s natural behavior is being changed because of antidepressant levels in the sea, this could seriously upset the natural balance of the ecosystem,” says Dr. Alex Ford, from the University of Portsmouth’s Institute of Marine Sciences.
For years, public health officials have told people that just because the bass and other fish in their waterways are contaminated with chlordane, PCBs, and methylmercury, it doesn’t mean the drinking water is unsafe. But the prescription-drugs levels in fish are precisely because the drinking water is unsafe.
Martha Rosenberg is a journalist from Chicago.
 
--Forwarded Message Attachment--
From: hshields at worldpath.net
To: hshields at worldpath.net
Subject: EPA - Industrial operations source of cancer causing drinking water contaminants 
Date: Wed, 2 Feb 2011 19:27:37 -0500

Action on Drinking Water Strategy: 
EPA will also be developing one regulation covering up to 16 chemicals that may cause cancer.  This group of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are chemicals such as industrial solvents, includes trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) as well as other regulated and some unregulated contaminants that are discharged from industrial operations.  The VOC standard will be developed as part of EPA's new strategy for drinking water, announced by the Administrator in March, 2010.  A key principle of the strategy is to address contaminants as groups rather than individually in order to provide public health protections more quickly and also allow utilities to more effectively and efficiently plan for improvements. 

----- Original Message ----- 
From: U.S. EPA 
To: hshields at worldpath.net 
Sent: Wednesday, February 02, 2011 3:29 PM
Subject: Water News Release (Region 2): EPA To Develop Regulation for Perchlorate and Toxic Chemicals in Drinking Water
 
 
EPA To Develop Regulation for Perchlorate and Toxic Chemicals in Drinking Water 
  
Contact: Jalil Isa (News Media Only) (Prensa solamente), isa.jalil at epa.gov, 202-564-3226, 202-564-4355 
 
WASHINGTON – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa P. Jackson today announced the Agency’s decision to move forward with the development of a regulation for perchlorate, to protect Americans from any potential health impacts while also continuing to take steps to ensure the quality of the water they drink. The decision to undertake a first-ever national standard for perchlorate reverses a decision made by the previous Administration and comes after Administrator Jackson ordered EPA scientists to undertake a thorough review of the emerging science of perchlorate.  Perchlorate is both a naturally occurring and man-made chemical, and scientific research indicates that it may impact the normal function of the thyroid which produces important developmental hormones. Thyroid hormones are critical to the normal development and growth of fetuses, infants and children. Based on this potential concern, EPA will move forward with proposing a formal rule. This process will include receiving input from key stakeholders as well as submitting any formal rule to a public comment process. 
  
In a separate action, the agency is also moving towards establishing a drinking water standard to address a group of up to 16 toxic chemicals that may pose risks to human health.  As part of the Drinking Water Strategy laid out by Administrator Jackson in 2010, EPA committed to addressing contaminants as a group rather than one at a time so that enhancement of drinking water protection can be achieved cost-effectively.  Today’s action delivers on the promise to strengthen public health protection from contaminants in drinking water. 
  
"Clean water is critical to the health and prosperity of every American community and a fundamental concern to every American family. EPA is hard at work on innovative ways to improve protections for the water we drink and give to our children, and the development of these improved standards is an important step forward," said EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson. "Our decisions are based on extensive review of the best available science and the health needs of the American people.” 
  
Action on Perchlorate: 
Scientific research indicates that perchlorate may disrupt the thyroid's ability to produce hormones that are critical to developing fetuses and infants.  Monitoring data show over four percent of public water systems have detected perchlorate and between 5 and 17 million people may be served drinking water containing perchlorate.  The science that has led to this decision has been peer reviewed by independent scientists and public health experts  including the National Academy of Sciences. Perchlorate is both a naturally occurring and man-made chemical that is used in the manufacture of rocket fuel, fireworks, flares and explosives, and may be present in bleach and in some fertilizers. This decision reverses a 2008 preliminary determination by the previous Administration, and considers input from almost  39,000 public comments. 
  
EPA will continue to evaluate the science on perchlorate health effects and occurrence in public water systems.   EPA will also now begin to evaluate the feasibility and affordability of treatment technologies to remove perchlorate and will examine the costs and benefits of potential standards.  
For information on perchlorate, please visit http://water.epa.gov/drink/contaminants/unregulated/perchlorate.cfm 
  
Action on Drinking Water Strategy: 
EPA will also be developing one regulation covering up to 16 chemicals that may cause cancer.  This group of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are chemicals such as industrial solvents, includes trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) as well as other regulated and some unregulated contaminants that are discharged from industrial operations.  The VOC standard will be developed as part of EPA's new strategy for drinking water, announced by the Administrator in March, 2010.  A key principle of the strategy is to address contaminants as groups rather than individually in order to provide public health protections more quickly and also allow utilities to more effectively and efficiently plan for improvements. 

More information on drinking water strategy: 
http://water.epa.gov/lawsregs/rulesregs/sdwa/dwstrategy/index.cfm 
  
Administrator Jackson’s 2010 Speech on EPA’s New Drinking Water Strategy: 
http://yosemite.epa.gov/opa/admpress.nsf/a883dc3da7094f97852572a00065d7d8/bbd6b38fa4f29ace852576ee004a4dde!OpenDocument 
  
  		 	   		  


More information about the Sludgewatch-l mailing list